Food Of Vietnam      FOODOFVIETNAM.COM   

Custom Search
  Visit XUVN.COM for More Insight of Vietnam 

Enter "XUVN (Search Subject)" into the above Google Search Box to find Search Subject in XUVM.COM

Read in Vietnamese - Bằng Tiếng Việt (Việt ngữ)
Home page Vietnamese Dessert As Health Food Vietnamese Cuisine Cooking Utensil
Diet & Fitness Popular Dish Nutrition Asian Grocery Online Eat & Travel in Vietnam Vietnamese Recipe Search
History of Vietnamese Food Vietnamese Beauty- Beautify With Food Ingredients & Nutrition Vietnamese Food Calories Restaurant Search
Cooking tips Restaurant Menu Using Cooking Oil Using Herbs- Spices Grocery search
How to Cook Beef How to Cook Shrimp How to Cook Pork How to Cook Fish How to Cook Chicken
Food to Enhance Look Bizarre food of Vietnam Vietnamese Dance/ Performing Arts Vietnamese food Video Clips Visit XUVN.COM for More Insight of Vietnam

 

Vietnamese Culture Vietnamese Society Vietnam Towns in America Asian Communities in America Vietnam Headline News
Vietnamese Dating Dating Race Factor Dating in Vietnam Online Dating Sites Popular Vietnamese Dating Sites
Vietnamese Art Vietnamese Dance/ Performing Arts Vietnamese Singers  Modern/Contemporary Vietnamese Music Vietnamese Religion & Beliefs
Vietnamese Music  Vietnamese Musicians   Vietnamese Music Overview Vietnamese Traditional   Music Modern/Contemporary Vietnamese Music
Vietnam Tourism Overview Vietnam Picture Tour Picture Tour Show Vietnamese Legends & Folklores Vietnamese Classical Literature
Vietnam Travel Guide Vietnamese Clothing Video about Vietnam Vietnamese Religion & Beliefs Vietnamese Music & Performing Arts 
Vietnamese History Vietnam History Vietnamese Language Vietnamese Cosmetic Surgery Vietnamese Classical Literature
Vietnamese Communities Vietnamese Values Vietnamese Culture Vietnamese Woman Culture   Vietnamese Customs
Vietnamese Feast Vietnamese Names Vietnam Tourism Everything You want to Know to get FIT Fitness Activities Guide

Google Advertises Below

 

 

 

 

 

MOBILE FOODOFVIETNAM 

(MOBILE VERSION OF FOOD OF VIETNAM)

Vietnamese Food Calories

  Chinese Food Calories     Thai Food Calories  

These are typical Caloric Values of some Popular Vietnamese Dishes, For more Nutritional Information 

Low Calorie-Low Fat-Healthy Vietnamese Recipes With Nutritional Information  

   Popular Dish Nutrition  

Here is the issue. We all want to eat healthy. Yet, is calorie count a gauge of this? We have to keep in mind that calories are only one aspect of food composition that helps you gauge how healthy it is. Basically, you look at calories and say to yourself one of two things, "high or low." It's a little bit like your body weight. Weight alone is a very limited source of information. You have to know how tall someone is to put weight into context. For example, is 150lbs a healthy or unhealthy weight? Again, that depends on how tall you are and if you are a man or a woman. Also, you must know exactly what someone eats and if they are getting adequate nutrition to determine if they are healthy. We've all known thin people who have very unhealthy diets. So calorie content really doesn't signify "health" per say. It tells you the energy density of food and if it puts you at risk for eating a lot of calories or a little. 

Basically, ignoring or obsessing about calories is a problem. The trick is to raise your awareness of what you are eating. Think content not calories. Does this food give me nutrition, balance and a reasonable amount of energy for what my body needs?

Living in US, food is plentiful, over eating becomes daily concern, even for athletically active person as myself. Watching what you eat is important, but an obsessive calorie counting is a No No.

Drinks: 

Meals: Vietnamese

Sauces: 

Soups: 

  Well, if you do concern about the nutritional & caloric values of what you eat, it would be interesting to you for visiting

 

Drinks: Vietnamese Coffee (hot)

Serving Size: 1 cup Calories 123

Vietnam Coffee Vietnamese Milk Coffee

How to make Cà phê sữa đá

Meals: Banh Cuon (Steam Rice Sheet w. Pork)

Serving Size: 1 roll Calories 107

Meals: Bo Nuong (beef satay)

Serving Size: 2 sticks Calories 265

Meals: Bo Xao Dau Phong (ginger beef w. onion, fish sauce)

Serving Size: 1 whole dish Calories 750

Meals: Ca Chien Gung (whole snapper w. ginger)

Serving Size: 1 whole dish Calories 600

Meals: Canh Chay (vegetable & tofu soup)

Serving Size: 1 w dish Calories 80

Meals: Cari (Curry) Chicken w. Rice Noodle

Serving Size: 1cup curry with 1 cup noodle Calories 675

 

Meals: Cari (Curry) Chicken w. Steamed Rice

Serving Size: 1 cup curry with 1 cup rice Calories 660

 

Meals: Cari (Curry) Chicken, no rice or noodles

Serving Size: 1 cup Calories 480

 

Meals: Cuu Xao Lan (curried lamb, vegetables in coconut)

Serving Size: 1 whole dish Calories 900

 

Meals: Ga Chien (crispy chicken, plum sauce)

Serving Size: 1 whole dish Calories 900

 

Meals: Ga Nuong (chicken satay, sauce)

Serving Size: 1 whole dish Calories 240

 

Meals: Ga Xao Rau (marinated chicken braised w. vegetables)

Serving Size: 1 whole dish Calories 800

 

Meals: Gio Lua (Lean Pork Pie)

Serving Size: 1/6 of a pie Calories 260

 

Meals: Goi Cuon (Cold Spring Rolls)

Serving Size: 1 roll Calories 60

 

Meals: Goi Du Du (Green Papaya Salad)

Serving Size: 1/2 cup Calories 150

 

Meals: Rau Cai Xao Chay (stir fried vegetables, soy sauce)

Serving Size: 1 whole dish Calories 400

 

Meals: Thit Bo Vien (Beef Balls)

Serving Size: 6 balls Calories 225

 

Meals: Thit Heo Goi Baup Cai (spicy cabbage rolls w. pork)

Serving Size: 1 roll Calories 200

 

Sauces: Nuoc Cham (Hot Sauce)

Serving Size: 2 teaspoons Calories 4

 

Soups: Bun Bo Hue (Hot & Spicy Soup w. Pork Feet)

Serving Size: 11/2 cup Calories 850

 

Soups: Bun Bo Hue (Hot & Spicy Soup, no Pork Feet)

Serving Size: 11/2 cup Calories 350

 

Soups: Pho Bo (Beef Noodle Soup)

Serving Size: 11/2 cup Calories 425

 

Soups: Pho Ga (Chicken Noodle Soup)

Serving Size: 11/2 cup Calories 475

 

Soups: Pho Tai (Rare Beef & Noodle Soup w. garnish, typical serving style)

Serving Size: 11/2 cup Calories 449

 

Soups: Pho Tai (Rare Beef & Noodle Soup)

Serving Size: 11/2 cup Calories 404

 

How to calculate for a food serving portion calories

  • Search for a recipe of said food
  • Calculate for the calories contained in each ingredient (use nutritional Web site such as www.calorieking.com/ )
  • Sum up total calories contained in all ingredients
  • Divide the total calories in the recipe by its number of serving to get the calories per serving.

Tips for Feeling Good, Looking Good & Living well

Calories: How many do you need?

Calories measure the amount of energy that is supplied by carbohydrates, fats, and proteins in food. The energy supplied by food is needed for vital body functions like growth, movement, and thought.

A weight gain results when the number of calories consumed is greater than the number of calories used. When the number of calories consumed is less than the number of calories used, there is weight loss. There is no weight change when calories consumed equals calories used. Each person's energy balance is directly related to a combination of their behaviors, environment, and genetics.

Food labels identify the amount of calories and nutrients per serving. But how many calories do you need to fuel your daily activities? The National Academy of Sciences makes the following daily calorie recommendations:

  • 1,600 calories is about right for many sedentary women and some older adults
  • 2,200 calories is about right for most children, teenage girls, active women, and many sedentary men (Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding may need somewhat more.)
  • 2,800 calories is about right for teenage boys, many active men, and some very active women

Excess calorie consumption plays a major role in being overweight. The convenience of fast food restaurants, pre-packaged foods, and soft drinks affect our food choices. These are likely to be high in fat and calories. Large portion servings also increase caloric consumption. People who do not know the basics about nutrition or understand food labels are less likely to make healthy food choices. Carbohydrates, proteins, and fats are the major nutrient components of the diet. Carbohydrates and proteins provide 4 calories per gram, while fats contribute 9 calories per gram. Food choices and food preparation effect the amount of calories we consume. Most Americans follow meal plans that are much too high in fat. A diet low in fat will reduce the risk for getting certain diseases and help maintain a healthy weight. To lower fat intake, choose plenty of whole grain products, vegetables, and fruits that provide needed vitamins, minerals, fiber, and complex carbohydrates.

Keep the fat content of your foods to 30 percent or less. The total grams of fat for a 1,600 calorie diet would be 53, for a 2,200 calorie diet the total would be 73, and for a 2,800 calorie diet the total would be 93. Therefore, for a 30 percent fat diet, 837 calories of a 2,200 calorie diet may be fat calories. Counting fat grams has become popular. To determine the fat in the food you eat in terms of fat grams, read the food package label. It will tell you how many grams of fat and what kinds of fats are in each serving.

If there is a balance between your caloric intake and your activity level, you should maintain your weight. If your caloric intake increases and your activity level does not, you will probably gain weight. If you eat fewer calories and increase your activity level, you should lose weight.

Minimum Daily Calorie intake

It is difficult to set absolute bottom calorie levels, because everyone has different body composition and activity levels. Health authorities do set some baselines - these are 1200 calories per day for women, and 1800 calories per day for men. This doesn't really make too much sense - are you are sedentary person with little muscle mass? Or someone who is tall, muscular, and exercises a lot? Absolute levels don't work - but do give us a starting point.

When reducing calories:

Try not to lower your calorie intake by more than 1000 calories below maintenance. Doing so may invoke the bodies starvation response, which can lead to the Yo-yo dieting effect.

Try to gradually lower calories. A sudden drop (such as 500 calories or more) can cause your metabolism to slow.

Eating to Lose Weight, Gain Weight, or Maintain Weight?

We’ll use the 2,000-calorie recommendation as a jumping-off point. If you’re trying to lose weight, you should subtract up to 500 calories per day---since 3,500 calories is equal to a pound of fat, this will yield one pound a week in fat loss. (1—2 pounds per week is the rate agreed upon by fitness and nutrition experts as ideal for long-term success.) So, if you’re attempting to lose weight, start with 1,500 calories, if you’re looking to maintain your weight, stick with 2,000 calories, and if you’re trying to gain weight, start with 2,500 calories.

However, if you’re also working out regularly, remember that you’re also burning additional calories through exercise and therefore require extra energy. If your workouts are particularly intense, you may need to increase your number by 50 or 100 calories just to get through them.

Strength Training More Than Twice a Week?

Every pound of muscle gained through resistance training increases your resting metabolic rate by 35—50 calories per day (a number, though controversial, that is still agreed upon by many health experts). This may mean you can allow yourself a slight bump in calories if you are consistently strength training 3 or more times per week. This is not an excuse to eat more, but rather a lifestyle habit to factor into your total calorie burn---it means you’re active, and therefore will require more calories than a person who is sedentary.

This adjustment will, of course, vary from person to person. If you’re a man trying to put on muscle weight, you may need to add extra calories as you gain mass. If you’re trying to lose weight from fat but increase your muscle tone, and you’re exercising regularly, you may safely add up to 50 calories to your starting number. Remember to pay attention to how you feel: if you don’t have enough energy to get through your workouts, you may not be eating enough.

5’1”, 6’3”, or Somewhere in Between?

Perhaps more than anything else, your size dictates how many calories you burn daily. A 6-foot-tall, 200-pound person burns more calories than a 5-foot-tall, 100-pound person. Period. It takes more energy, or calories, to move a 200-pound body around whether that person is overweight or lean. So, if you’re very petite and trying to lose weight, 1,500 calories may be too many. Likewise, if you’re very tall, it might not be enough. Assume the 2,000-calorie recommendation from Cooking Light is for an average woman of around 150 pounds and adjust accordingly.

Remember that these are just estimates and that caloric needs vary from person to person. You may need to exercise a little trial and error: determine your starting number based on your age and gender, and then decide whether you want to lose, maintain, or gain weight. Keep a food journal to ensure that your calorie consumption matches that goal number, and then adjust as you go based on your workout habits and results. If you have a large amount of weight to lose or are still uncertain, consult an expert to calculate your exact calorie needs.

K Calories/hour for Type of Exercise 

Sleeping 55
Eating 85
Sewing 85
Knitting 85
Sitting 85
Standing 100
Driving 110
Office Work 140
Housework 160+

Golf, with trolley 180
Golf, without trolley 240
Gardening, planting 250
Dancing, ballroom 260
Walking, 3mph 280
Table Tennis 290
Gardening, hoeing 350
Tennis 350+
Water Aerobics 400

Skating/blading 420+
Dancing, aerobic 420+
Aerobics 450+
Bicycling, moderate 450+
Jogging, 5mph 500
Gardening, digging 500
Swimming, active 500+
Cross country ski machine 500+
Hiking 500+

Step Aerobics 550+
Rowing 550+
Power Walking 600+
Cycling, studio 650
Squash 650+
Skipping rope 700+
Running 700+

Burning fat vs. burning calories

Research shows aerobic activity done at a low to moderate intensity actually burns more stored fat, than if exercising at a higher intensity. Fat is a slow burning energy source utilized during longer bouts of cardio exercise. People interested in dropping pounds should perform 60 to 90 minutes of cardio, according to the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans by the USDA. The amount of fat you burn has little to do with your choice of aerobic exercise, and everything to do with the amount of time you devote to sustainable cardiovascular exercise. 

To ensure you’re exercising enough, you’ll first need to determine your target heart rate zone. Known as the Karvonen Formula, it provides the baseline of your training zones, which range from 50 percent to 70 percent for fat loss. 

The equation:

  • Subtract 220 minus your age =  Maximum Heart Rate (MHR)
  • Now, subtract your MHR from your Resting Heart Rate (RHR) = Heart Rate Reserve
  • Multiply your HRR by 50%, then add RHR = lower training range
  • Multiply your HRR by 70%, then add RHR = moderate training range
  • Multiply your HRR by 70%, then add RHR = higher training range

(Get your RHR by locating your pulse at rest, count the number of times your heart beats during 30 seconds, and multiply that number by 2)

Although we have already established that exercising at a lower intensity burns more fat calories than carbohydrates, the overall total calories burned is greater at a higher intensity.

To burn calories, you will need to exercise harder at a moderate to higher intensity of 75 – 85 percent of your maximum heart rate. According to the Karvonen Formula (above), a greater number of calories are used in 30 minutes than 60 minutes of fat burning.

When deciding on methods to burn fat and burn calories it all starts with you. It depends on your body weight, fitness level, metabolism, muscle development and gender.

Burning fat vs. burning carbohydrate

During exercise and physical activity, the primary fuels used by muscles are carbohydrate and fat. When mild exercise is performed there is a tendency to burn relatively more fat and less glucose, but as exercise becomes more intense, a higher fraction of the energy demands of the muscle are supplied by glucose, until at the highest intensities almost only carbohydrates are used. Is this shift in fuel source a property of the muscle itself, or does it represent the interplay between what is happening in the muscle and the exercise-related responses in the rest of the body?

The study, performed at the Copenhagen Muscle Research Center at the University of Copenhagen, examined muscle fuel utilization in response to graded exercise performed with only one leg. Nine healthy males performed one-leg exercise at 25, 45, and 85% of maximal workload. Their results showed that, when only a small mass of muscle is contracting, and blood flow and oxygen supply are not limited by central circulatory capacity, the shift in fuel source from fat to glucose as exercise intensity increases does not occur.

Helge et al.'s findings show that the adaptations in the rest of the body are the key to this fuel source shift during whole body exercise. They also help scientists understand why athletes "hit the wall" during events like the marathon, and they have implications for the adaptations made in middle-aged adults who are using exercise to prevent or treat conditions like diabetes and obesity. If the mechanisms can be fully understood, it may be possible to develop agents that allow fat oxidation to be maintained even during intense exercise with a large muscle mass.

Calorie Intake in Female-Headed and Male-Headed Households in Vietnam

 

Home page Vietnamese Dessert As Health Food Vietnamese Cuisine Cooking Utensil
Diet & Fitness Popular Dish Nutrition Asian Grocery Online Eat & Travel in Vietnam Vietnamese Recipe Search
History of Vietnamese Food Vietnamese Beauty- Beautify With Food Ingredients & Nutrition Vietnamese Food Calories Restaurant Search
Cooking tips Restaurant Menu Using Cooking Oil Using Herbs- Spices Grocery search
How to Cook Beef How to Cook Shrimp How to Cook Pork How to Cook Fish How to Cook Chicken
Food to Enhance Look Bizarre food of Vietnam Vietnamese Dance/ Performing Arts Vietnamese food Video Clips Visit XUVN.COM for More Insight of Vietnam
 
Vietnamese Culture Vietnamese Society Vietnam Towns in America Asian Communities in America Vietnam Headline News
Vietnamese Dating Dating Race Factor Dating in Vietnam Online Dating Sites Popular Vietnamese Dating Sites
Vietnamese Art Vietnamese Dance/ Performing Arts Vietnamese Singers  Modern/Contemporary Vietnamese Music Vietnamese Religion & Beliefs
Vietnamese Music  Vietnamese Musicians   Vietnamese Music Overview Vietnamese Traditional   Music Modern/Contemporary Vietnamese Music
Vietnam Tourism Overview Vietnam Picture Tour Picture Tour Show Vietnamese Legends & Folklores Vietnamese Classical Literature
Vietnam Travel Guide Vietnamese Clothing Video about Vietnam Vietnamese Religion & Beliefs Vietnamese Music & Performing Arts 
Vietnamese History Vietnam History Vietnamese Language Vietnamese Cosmetic Surgery Vietnamese Classical Literature
Vietnamese Communities Vietnamese Values Vietnamese Culture Vietnamese Woman Culture   Vietnamese Customs
Vietnamese Feast Vietnamese Names Vietnam Tourism Everything You want to Know to get FIT Fitness Activities Guide

Food Of Vietnam      FOODOFVIETNAM.COM   

Custom Search
  Visit XUVN.COM for More Insight of Vietnam 

Enter "XUVN (Search Subject)" into the above Google Search Box to find Search Subject in XUVM.COM